Re:Creators Ep 22: The Roads Home and a Meta Finale

Quick Summary

In Re:Creators episode 22, “Re:CREATORS,” Yuuya Mirokuji and Shou Hakua take their creator, Yatouji Ryou, on a harrowing farewell journey. Hikawa Hikaru has some choice words for her creator, Nishio Oonishi — but what are they? Meteora Österreich and Souta Mizushino visit Setsuna Shimazaki’s grave in search of answers and come away with surprising answers. And you’ll never guess (or maybe you will!) who really authored Re:CREATORS!

Note: This post may include spoilers, so be cautious.

What’s In This Post

Quick Episode Summary
3 Favorite Moments
Thoughts
Related Posts

3 Favorite Moments

This shot so convincingly conveyed Matsubara’s self-loathing at what he perceived as his role in Selesia’s death. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.
  1. After Selesia Upitiria fell in battle, her creator Takashi Matsubara held himself together through the rest Elimination Chamber Festival. He even congratulated Mizushino on a job well done after their shared victory. Then, he abruptly left the control room (1:15). Marine immediately ran after him. She obviously understood what he was going through. Meteora followed right behind her. They found Matsubara wracked with sobs. Together, they were able to pull him out of his downward spiral of blaming himself for Selesia’s death. Meteora said what had to be said, namely that without his decisions, they would all have perished. Marine reminded him that he was still Selesia’s writer, and she and her world were still there, right where he left them. “I want you to keep your promise to her,” Meteora said. “Give her world stories and coffee.” This scene was a microcosm of what I love about this series: amazing, interesting characters who prop each other up as they fight together against an insurmountable foe.
  2. Meteora: the emotional healer of the Re:Creators series! She even helped Mizushino out of his funk, and I thought that was almost impossible! Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

    Meteora’s amazing ability to sooth and heal was on display again when she and Mizushino visited Shimazaki’s grave (9:37). First, she still uses the “-dono” honorific when she refers to him, and I think that is just too cool. Second, she’s able to convince him that Magane Chikujouin’s power only prepared the audience’s acceptance level. Mizushino’s skill was what created a Shimazaki that Altair was able to accept. His skill was what really brought her back. And “really brought her back” is apparently what Meteora thinks actually happened. Though she stops short of actually saying so (10:35), I think it’s clear that Meteora suspected that somehow, Mizushino managed to bring the real Shimazaki back from the grave. I’m glad the show left this ambiguous, but it’s still a beautiful thought.

  3. In a show that so often appeared to co-inhabit our world, I guess I shouldn’t be surprised to find out that Meteora was the “real” author of Re:CREATORS! Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

    Meteora’s having a hard time coming up with a title for the first work she’s going to submit for publication, so she texts Mizushino. After some back and forth, what title does she come up with? I should have seen it coming. Maybe you did see it coming. But the title she choose? “Re:CREATORS” (21:30). Meteora Österreich, the mage who went up against Altair and almost won, the mage who, with the help of Team Kikuchihara, set the stage for Mizushino’s creation to finally win the battle, was the one who wrote Re:CREATORS. Given how often this show artfully challenged the fourth wall, I can’t think of a more appropriate ending. And wasn’t Meteora just adorable in regular Earth garb? Mizushino is an idiot if he doesn’t spend more time with her…

Thoughts

Did you hear the soundtrack song that was playing as Meteora opened the return gate (11:05)? It was “God of Inkfrom the original soundtrack. Can’t get much more appropriate than that!

As Meteora opened the gate to send the Created home, the song playing in the background was God of Ink. How appropriate is that? Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

The fallout from the blast

It overwhelms you

She didn’t tell you

The ink of God on the page

And her rage coming out…

Seriously, if you haven’t purchased this original soundtrack (OST) yet, and if you liked the series music at all, I suggest you check it out! It’s been a long time since I liked an OST this much. I played it non-stop all summer as I helped my wife with a programming project.

“Just like Altair said, passion and despair, good wishes and bad wishes, were contained in that moment. I want to try writing a story like that myself,” Meteora said (15:45) as she convinced the creators that she was happy to stay in our world. When Marine pointed out that Meteora’s magic was about to disappear, Meteora said, “I don’t need magic to create. All you need is passion and practice. Fate will decide the rest.”

Marine, seemingly speaking for all of the creators, was worried that Meteora would miss her magical powers. Not so, she said! She could create without magic. Just like all of us can, with passion and skill! Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

This was the heart of Re:Creators. The whole series from start to finish was a love letter from a creator to the community of creators. The show established the process of writing and drawing stories as a power to defend the world from destruction — almost weaponizing art! The show lovingly showed artists working hard on their craft. We got to see their insecurities, their drive, and their almost insane dedication to creating works that some in the world would dismiss as frivolous. But the goal was to delight fans, and if their works of art touch the hearts of others, then every ounce of effort was worth it.

Since I’m trying to re-ignite my novel career (for the fifth or sixth time in 30 years — never give up, never surrender!), this spoke to me on a fundamental level. I’m in love with the idea that artists can affect people and make the world better. It sounds Pollyanna-ish, but all cynicism aside, changing the world has to start somewhere. When we’re surrounded by failures of our political systems; when we’re beset by shortcomings in religious hierarchies and their adherents; and when we’re failed by the economic systems that underlie the commerce of the world, if we aren’t going to give up in despair, we have to have something to turn to. Human creativity in the face of all that darkness seems to me to be a good place to start.

What do you think? Does the idea of human advancement through art seem so strange? What were your favorite moments of this episode? Let me know in the comments!

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Post Author: tcrow