Re:Creators Ep 6: A Deadly Schoolgirl and a Shifting Allegiance

Note: This post may include spoilers, so be cautious!

Quick Summary

In Re:Creators episode 6, “You are the one who knows where justice lies,” Makagami Chikujouin  makes a huge — and I mean huge — splash in her debut. Souta Mizushino tries to bring himself to tell the others about the 40th Saber. Mamika Kirameki and Alicetelia February try to build a closer friendship, but it’s soon tested to the limit. Blitz Talker puts on a firearms demonstration while Meteora Österreich and Selesia Upitiria fight a loosing battle to keep the peace. And then an unexpected Created comes to their aid…

What’s In This Post

Quick Episode Summary
What Happened in this Episode
What I Liked in this Episode
What I Liked Not so Much in this Episode
Thoughts about the Episode
Related Posts

What Happened

Selesia sensed that something was bothering Mizushino, but she didn’t want to pry. She should have pried. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.
  1. Mizushino’s in a state of near panic as he watches the video for World Étude. Selesia stops by — knocking at his upstairs window — to give him an update on their search for other Created who may already be in the real world. She could tell something was bothering him, but she didn’t press. At about the same time, Chikujouin was skipping down the center of a shopping mall, realizing she wasn’t in her world any longer, and not feeling too concerned. She seemed excited by the possibilities.
  2. Kirameki meets Alicetelia, who’s made camp under a bridge and who’s using the wood from park benches for fuel. Kirameki’s still troubled by the memories of her fight against Selesia. The two of them are searching for a new Created who’s supposed to be in the area. Alicetelia hopes the new comer is powerful; Kirameki hopes for a good person.
  3. Chikujouin didn’t want to pay for the book. The bookstore owner should have just let her go… Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

    Later that morning, Chikujouin tries to leave a bookstore without paying for a book. She lies when she says it’s her book; she writes something on one of the pages and gets him to say that’s a lie, too. A lie about a lie is the trigger for her power, and she summons a supernatural being to rip the man apart. His blood splashes everywhere. She calmly leaves after remembering she wanted a bag for “her” book. Aki Kikuchihara and Meteora visit the scene and come to an obvious conclusion: that this was caused by a Created, and that she’s a villain character type.

  4. Later that day, Chikujouin happens upon Kirameki and Alicetelia in a park. Both of them are in their “transformed” states. Kirameki tries to convince the new-comer to join them to help make their worlds better with the help of the Creators. Chikujouin sees tremendous possibilities for fun — and likely not the kind of funs bystanders would survive. Alicetelia, reading the schoolgirl’s mood, comes to the conclusion she can’t work with a villain who has a murderous aura, and the Magical Slayer can’t convince her friend otherwise. Chikujouin further engages Alicetelia by suggesting the warrior kills for fun, and that all of her pretense of justice is just based on her emotions. Selesia and Meteora arrive just in time to prevent Chikujouin’s power from tricking Alicetelia into killing herself.

    Chikujouin was animalistically delighted that Alicetelia bought into a lie about a lie. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.
  5. The black-uniformed schoolgirl seems delighted by the surprise visit. And she’s not in the least bit contrite when Selesia asks about the bookstore owner’s death. Alicetelia, still intent on killing Chikujouin, tells the two to step aside, but Meteora and Selesia make it clear there’re here to prevent damage and chaos. The Magical Slayer wants everyone to talk more — she’s almost distraught at the contradictions that she can’t resolve. But Alicetelia shuts her down. Nor will the warrior listen to Meteora’s evidence that the Military Uniform Princess is deceiving them, or that humans aren’t the gods she presented them as being. Alicetelia’s attack blasts Meteora and Selesia through two bridges and across several hundred meters. Even then, Kirameki asks her to consider. Calling her little friend naive, Alicetelia continues her assault. She and Selesia are almost evenly matched with the sword and lance, but Blitz’s arrival puts Selesia — and Meteora — on the defensive. Our heroes learn that Blitz’s pistol shoots different kinds of bullets. The Gravity Bomb disables Meteora, and Blitz moves in to kill her. Kirameki brushes the attack aside, asking why he has to continue fighting after Meteora can’t go on. Asserting that the mage is a threat, he increases his rate of fire, but Kirameki continues defending, saying that if she stands by and does nothing, she’ll be too ashamed to face her friends.

    Kirameki wasn’t designed to handle the complexities or contradictions she’s faced with; but she’s not letting that stop her. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

What I Liked

Selesia seemed delighted to have a smart phone. Her world’s technologically m ore advanced than ours, but she still found the phone powerful and easy to use. It was nice seeing her relaxed and carefree, even if it didn’t last!

“It’s dangerous for a girl to walk around alone at night light that,” the grade-school student Kirameki tells the warrior Alicetelia. The joke wasn’t lost on the elder, either. I really liked the two of them having a quiet moment to get to know each other. It’s clear that Kirameki is serious about avoiding violence; she not even comfortable breaking rules, as we saw by how she reacted to Alicetelia burning park benches! Alicetelia’s resolve is equally clear. Even without the confirmation at the end of the episode, I could see that these two are on an unfortunate collision course.

I probably shouldn’t like this character, given how evil she is and all, but — dang! — Chikujouin is an interesting character! Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

I probably shouldn’t like this since she’s a villain and all, but I really like Chikujouin’s laugh. Heck, I like her personality! The whole “slaughtering the innocent (though obnoxious) book-store owner with a supernatural creature” thing aside, she seems like a lot of fun.

I noticed she sent one of the Hounds of Tindalos after the poor bookstore owner. Turns out they’re part of the official Cthulhu Mythos. The black-uniformed schoolgirl doesn’t mess around!

Rui Kanoya certainly seems to be settling in! We see him briefly flirting with blushing young women. I’m struggling to understand how telling the young women that he rides in a robot was so effective as a pickup line, but I’ve been out of the marketing for decades, so maybe things have changed!

Outrageous lie of the episode: Chikujouin saying, “I’m a perfectly normal schoolgirl.” I’m pretty sure even the Magical Slayer saw through that lie!

Alicetelia took an almost instant dislike to Chikujouin. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

Does Alicetelia kill because her perception of justice is based on feelings? Is killing out of a sense of emotion-based justice any different from killing for fun, as Chikujouin suggested? I can’t say the black-uniformed schoolgirl’s wrong. How often do we see in history how what the mob called justice was simply a convenient and lethal application of racism or prejudice — dark emotions? Even in this case, I’m not sure Alicetelia’s using a justice based on sound principles. She too often jumps to conclusions. Often, it seems she’s just impatient!

When Alicetelia said says that she won’t die at the hands of someone like Chikujouin, the latter’s breathy chuckle gave me chills. That was the sound of hunger. Maaya Sakamoto, the voice actor, did a scary good job there!

Despite what Alicetelia said, I thought Meteora’s argument that the humans in the real world weren’t really like gods was effective. I mean, if we were really gods,* we would be a lot more powerful.

Alicetelia’s battle with Selesia was fast-paced, beautiful to watch, and brutal. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

Does Chikujouin have no fear? She watches Alicetelia’s power blast Selesia and Meteora though large concrete structures just a handful of meters in front of her, and she whistles in appreciation?

Both the sound effects and the music during Alicetelia and Selesia’s battle were spot on.

Blitz’s reason for firing on Meteora after she was down — namely, that if she gets back up, she could be a threat in the future — was tactically sound. It was also morally reprehensible. It was also the thing the Magical Slayer needed to hear to cement her resolve. Blitz might be powerful, but he doesn’t seem to have a sense for how people will respond to what he says.

Of course, the animation continues to be beautiful. Mundane moments like Selesia and Mizushino talking in his room look just as vibrant as Alicetelia unleashing a spectacular magical attack against Selesia and Meteora.

The animation looks every bit as good in epic battle scenes like this as it did in small intimate scenes. Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

* As evidence for how effective this show is at creating a suspension of disbelief, it had me thinking that the “real world” from Meteora’s perspective was the world I’m sitting in right now. It was a brief thing, and maybe I should have corrected myself in the original reference. I left it, though, just to show how I was thinking about the show as I wrote the review.

What I Liked Less

It was too short. Yes, I know, it was regulation length. But it was too short.

Thoughts

With this episode, the gang’s all here! At least, the gang as defined by the opening credits.

What a delightful character Chikujouin is! Okay, sure, she killed a bookshop owner with a clear sense of glee, and that’s a serious negative. But as characters go, she’s enthralling. She adjusts almost instantly to being in our world. She’s so excited that she can’t seem to stop pirouetting, and she seems to authentically enjoy watching the Created clash at the end. It’s hard for me to stay mad at her.

Can Meteora claim credit for her intelligence, or Selesia her strength? Is Chikujouin to blame for her murderous forays? Or are they simply behaving as they were written to behave? Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

I wonder how much of that is because I’ve had to ask myself: Can I blame her for acting how she was designed/written? While in the world of fiction, she’s more or less a puppet, I think. The writer creates the scenes, motivations, even her thoughts and feelings. So in that context, she can’t be blamed for anything. It’s all on the writer.

But now that she’s in the real world, is she culpable in a moral sense? Moral culpability hinges on intent and freedom to act. If your intent is good but you accidentally step on a kitten, you’re morally responsible (you should have been more careful! Poor kitty!), but not nearly as responsible as if you had intended to hurt the kitty. Likewise, if your ability to make decisions is impaired, you’re likely less responsible than if you retained all of you faculties.

Do the Created have free will? Are they able to rise above their written character and truly and freely make decisions? Or are they still limited to what the writer gave them? It’s clear that the Created can act in ways their Creators don’t like. Look how often Takashi Matsubara and Selesia argued! It’s less clear if they can grow beyond their Creator’s intend and become independent beings.

Why is it that Alicetelia can’t put aside her fears long enough to understand, while Meteora seems able to reason at least as well as a real-world human? Is it simply because of how they were written? Is something else at work? Capture from the Amazon Strike stream.

That leads to the final question in this line of thought: do the Created have souls? Are they full-fledged, sentient beings who can exercise free will and be responsible for their decisions? Or should their Creators accept the consequences for all of their actions? I don’t think the show’s explicitly addressed this, but I wouldn’t be in the least bit surprised if it did.

Finally, Kirameki’s decision to save Meteora shows a major flaw in the Uniform Military Princess’ plan: the better developed and powerful the character, the more that character can help her cause. But at the same time, the higher the probability that the Created could choose to turn against her! Losing Kirameki would be a serious setback for our antagonist.

Or would it? If her goal’s really to spread unrest and chaos, maybe Kirameki’s defection is also part of her plan? Or am I starting to channel Vizzini as he argues with the Man in Black in Princess Bride ?

What do you think of Chikujouin? Or of the idea that the Created have souls? Or, heck, what do you think about anything else in this episode? Let me know in the comments!

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Post Author: tcrow