Anime Best in Show

Review: Fairy gone Episode 19 Best in Show

Quick Summary

In Fairy gone episode 19, “Sad Voices and Black Book,” Marlya Noel left the injured Lily Heineman in Klara Kisenaria’s care and ran after the man who inexplicably had the fairy of her deceased comrade, Oz Mea. Though she tried to be cautious, her enemy ended up behind and ordered the mammoth fairy to attack. It charged her, and her death seemed certain, until something very strange happened. The fairy stopped, reared up, and began running into the walls. Her assailant was as bewildered as she was. Does this mean that Marlya has some kind of unusual power over other fairies? Why does the man seem almost gleeful even though he’s completely lost control of his fairy! Does it have anything to do with the difference between Marlya’s fairy and his?

Note: This post may include spoilers, so be cautious.

Best Moment in the Show

Golbarn Helwise just found out that one of his trusted comrades had completely betrayed him — and their entire people. That’s gotta hurt. Capture from the Funimation stream.

Dorothea’s Director Nein Auler had some very bad news for Prime Minister Golbarn Helwise: one of his oldest and most trusted comrades, someone who fought by his side for years, had betrayed him. And not only betrayed him in particular: he had betrayed the whole country, because what he was about to do would likely destroy United Zesskia. Completely. Just as years ago, Tupal had been turned into a desert, even though it had once been the center of civilization.

Free and Marlya stood nearby the conversation in the Prime Minister’s office. Golbarn turned to Free and asked him a difficult question point blank (16:15), “During the War of Unification, I was your enemy. My forces killed your friends and their families. They trampled your homeland underfoot! Despite that, why are you working for Unified Zesskia?! For Dorothea?!”

To his credit, Free didn’t even flinch. He said with conviction he was working for country and Dorothea because “… I never again want to see a conflict like the War of Unification… Using fairies… and weapons to brutally slaughter one another…”

Even though he fought in wars, Free had to be feeling the pressure when the Prime Minister asked him such a heated question. Capture from the Funimation stream.

Golbarn said that he could not agree more.

This is the type of morally gray-area conversation that I don’t often see in the fiction I consume, and I find that I miss it. How often do you have to work with people you’ve argued against? How often have our militaries been forced to work beside people they’d just days before been shooting at?

Heck, look at the two sides from World War II. That wasn’t very long ago, yet I’m reviewing anime that’s produced by a country my government had once called an enemy!

It was a refreshing bit of reality that I really enjoyed. The show’s been pretty good about showing the messy side of politics. What’s more, it has showed that old enemies can work together! Which is almost as uplifting as the idea that old friends can betray you and your entire species is depressing…

What did you think of revelations about Marlya in this episode? What was your Best in Show moment? Let me know in the comments!

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2 thoughts on “Review: Fairy gone Episode 19 Best in Show

  1. I don’t see much of a morally-grey area, here, to be honest. There are the “good guys” who want peace, and the guys who actively work towards an apocalypse of some sort (and they’re basically religious fanatics). And there’s secret knowledge. The show here was basically praising Free for not wanting revenge, which is – morally speaking – a pretty low bar I see in a lot of more clichéd works. Note how this is in active contrast to Veronica (who is likely “misguided” in the show’s terms) and maybe Wolfran, though I’m not sure yet what he wants. He might actually be fine with total destruction for all I know. In fact, he might be there to gloat at the fools who try to control the situation? The most interesting character, politically and morally speaking, I feel is Bitter Sweet with her personal connection to the Tupal situation. I’m not entirely sure what she wants, but it’s likely anti-thetical to a repeat of the situation.

    Thematically, the most important moment in this episode was when Mariya set the fairy free. That’s sort of key to the entire show, and the reason we’re having semi-sentient weapons in the first place. What are we willing to bet that the little one Mariya picked up in episode one is the sort of beast the opponents are looking for (a fairy-possessed fairy). I’ve always been wondering why this little creature is so focused on Nein (when it’s not Mariya). There’s something here the show hasn’t been telling us (or so I hope; that would be the most reddest herring I’ve seen in a while otherwise – Herring the Crimson [it’d deserve a hero name]).

    1. “and the guys who actively work towards an apocalypse of some sort (and they’re basically religious fanatics). ”

      You know, when I was growing up, I’d hear stories about religious fanatics who wanted the world dead. They’d put it more flamboyantly, but bringing about an apocalypse is bringing about an apocalypse. I honestly didn’t believe such people existed. I thought it was the USA/midwestern equivalent of an urban legend.

      Boy, was I ever surprised!

      This show does such a good job presented politically feasible situations that I practically suffered a flashback watching this episode…

      “The most interesting character, politically and morally speaking, I feel is Bitter Sweet with her personal connection to the Tupal situation. I’m not entirely sure what she wants, but it’s likely anti-thetical to a repeat of the situation.”

      That’s one reason it feels like the show comes alive whenever she’s on screen. Marlya had some great scenes, especially early in this episode, but Bitter’s been consistent. She’s just so alive with potential!

      “Thematically, the most important moment in this episode was when Mariya set the fairy free. ”

      I thought that scene was emotionally powerful, too.

      “I’ve always been wondering why this little creature is so focused on Nein (when it’s not Mariya). ”

      One thing this show’s good at is showing and not telling — except when it tells to death. And in this case, you’ve hit an important point: Just what _is_ Chima?

      “or so I hope; that would be the most reddest herring I’ve seen in a while otherwise – Herring the Crimson [it’d deserve a hero name]).”

      That’s great! For some reason it reminds me of the movie Clue…

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