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Review of Fairy gone Episode 10: The Cursed Child and the Guilty Survivor

Quick Summary

In Fairy gone episode 10, "Cursed Child," the surviving members of Dorothea are trying to work through their grief after the losses suffered in the previous episodeMariya Noel feels more and more like the "cursed child" of her youth, but she's not the only one hurting. Even Free Underbar, a soldier, feels the effects. Can the team hold together? Can they go through with their next mission? Any why is Mariya suddenly visiting a crime boss?

Note: This post may include spoilers, so be cautious.  

What's in This Post

3 Favorite Moments

Moment 1: Klara's Breath of Kindness

A small gesture of kindness can go a long way. Capture from the Funimation stream

This show seems to have found its groove. The previous two episodes were were focused and moved the plot forward, and this episode continues the trend by dealing with the aftermath of a colossal mission failure. Mariya, of course, blames herself for Oz Mare's death, and she begins to withdraw into herself. She's sitting on her bed, alone in the dark room, when Klara Kysenaria quietly knocked (3:53). Not receiving an answer, she knocked again, and Mariya finally asked her to come in. Holding a single candle for light, Klara pushed the door open. She immediately realized Mariya had been sitting in the the dark, so guess what she did! Klara blew her candle out. It was a small gesture of kindness, but I think it meant something to Mariya. 

Moment 2: Free's Survivor's Guilt

Free's survivor's guilt can't be easy to bear. Capture from the Funimation stream

We got a couple of scenes where Free is sitting along in bars. We don't know if he's getting drunk, but we know what he's doing: He's trying to deal with the death of a comrade. He's holding Oz's arm patch, and you can see that he's struggling with his emotions and memories. My favorite of these scenes seems to crystalize not only the previous scenes in this episode, but other scenes from previous episodes. In particular, it gives a lot of meaning to the flashback where Free remembered a comrade hurling himself in front of an attack to save him (see my Thoughts from episode 2). After dinner at Ray Dawn's estate, Free wanders outside to watch the clouds racing under the stars. He's still holding Oz's patch when he says (10:47), "Why? How is it I keep surviving?" Sure, we all want to survive! But we also want to think well of ourselves. Free feels guilty for surviving. He's still feeling the effects of the previous episode in addition to the weight he's been carrying since the war. This little scene made him feel a lot more authentic to me.

Moment 3: Free Absolves Mariya

Mariya had to feel a huge sense of relief! And disbelief, too, maybe... Capture from the Funimation stream

The scene at Don Jingle's house really worked for me. Mariya had visited Don Jingle -- who is actually an organized crime boss! -- because she had worked for him before as a body guard. He had been kind to her, and she still looked on him as a grandfather. Given how she was feeling, it's no wonder she sought out someone like that! She had told Klara she wanted to go alone, so of course Klara and Serge Tova followed her! Free even joined them after awhile. I'm not sure if Free was impatient or worried about her, but he decided to just walk in (16:00). Mariya's still an emotional wreck, and so's Free. Don kept his focus on Mariya's well-being, and he demanded to know serious Free was about protecting her, so he responded that "We risk our lives for each other's sakes." Serge and Klara agreed. At Mariya's continued protests that she wasn't up to it, Free knelt on one knee beside her (19:15) and told her not to run away; that she still had the goals she'd joined Dorothea to achieve; and that she didn't "have to run off for our sakes." Free hasn't shown such emotional insight before, so it's almost amazing that he said just the right thing to get through to her! They were used to danger; with or without her, they were going to be in the line of fire. But she doesn't need to protect them by running away because they can take care of themselves. Mariya must have felt a tremendous sense of relief!

Thoughts: Mariya Freed from Her Past?

Was I the only one who thought for a terrible second that Free was going to propose to Mariya when he went down on one knee? I was thinking, "Dude! Timing! This is not the right time!" Fortunately, it didn't play out that way. I think he's too old for her anyway, and I like them as a platonic pair better than I'd like them as lovers.

Did you see those artificial fairy vehicles after the end credits (23:23)? I've poked fun at them before, because they looked so ungainly! I've changed my mind, though. Seeing a couple dozen of them sprinting across a battle field was intimidating! Especially knowing they were jammed full of artificial fairies. The animation really sold it! They looked like some kind of unholy spider trucks!

In my summary of the previous episode, I wondered why Schwarz Diese had wanted to steal the fairy weapon since the Emperor had bestowed on him anyway. While reading the Reddit discussion of this episode, I came across a theory by user theguyfromuncle420__. His theory is that Schwarz didn't want Dorothea to inspect it, which makes sense. I think we'll get more details on his plans in the coming episodes (and it feels strange to have a new-found confidence in the show's plot!).

Speaking of new-found confidence, there was a lot I liked about this episode. I liked how it took seriously the consequences of the previous episode. I like watching the friendship grow between Mariya and Klara (who, for some reason I should probably figure out someday, remains my favorite character). Not only that, but it looks like some of the flashbacks that made no sense to me before actually had a dramatic purpose! 

You know, they don't make a bad team! Capture from the Funimation stream

All of that's kinda cool!

Another development I thought was encouraging was how Free took responsibility for bringing Mariya into Dorothea. It started almost flippantly, and he's now feeling the weight of that decision. True, he couldn't just let her go (seeing as how she has a fairy and all), so there are some mitigating circumstances. Still, I think it's healthy they're talking about these things with each other. 

Don Jingle seemed to agree near the end. I was really happy to see that there was a strong individual from Mariya's past who didn't die. He was someone who obviously could take care of himself (and a lot of others, too), so he sent a precedent that Free, Klara, and Serge could build on. No, Mariya wasn't a cursed child. She had been through the destruction of her village; she'd lived in a refugee camp; and she had stayed with individuals on the fringe of society who were far away from medical science. It's easy to see how a child could misperceive the implications (i.e., a risky life means a higher probability of death). It was beautiful to see Free, Klara, and Serge try to heal that misperception.

I like these characters. The world's growing on me. I really hope they keep moving in this positive direction!

What did you think of Don Jingle? What were your favorite moments? Let me know in the comments!

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11 thoughts on “Review of Fairy gone Episode 10: The Cursed Child and the Guilty Survivor

  1. So far, do you really enjoy Fairy Gone, and what audiences would you recommend it to? I might check it out. I didn’t before because a lot of people were saying the first three episodes or so were substandard or boring.

    1. That’s… a tough question.

      I don’t dislike it.

      I’m trying to like it.

      I like the animation. The sets are solid, and so are the costumes. The characters are visually appealing.

      But as a lot of others have pointed out, the show struggles with connecting character to plot and character with viewer. I think it’s close, and I think they can still pull it out. But I can’t recommend it without reservations.

      If you like historical fantasy with political overtones, you might enjoy it. It’s similar to Record of Grancrest War, though to be honest, I really liked most of those characters in spite of the plot that moved a light speed.

  2. My assumption is that Schwartz doesn’t want them to know that he has the Fairy Weapon and asking for it was the best way to get it out of the vault.

    As for the vehicles with the legs… I’m not on board with those and that final scene was hilarious. They just look stupid and impractical.

    I think I would have been fine with this episode earlier in the story which would have been possible had we not spent some much time doing nothing. At this stage, I don’t think we should still be setting up the story.

    And I’m really not connecting with these characters, I don’t know exactly what it is, but they seem a bit flat and lifeless. The thing I’m looking forward to now is the midseason break…

    1. “As for the vehicles with the legs… I’m not on board with those and that final scene was hilarious. They just look stupid and impractical.”

      Maybe I’ve had one too many encounters with large insects! And I’m starting to buy into my own theory of political graft and constituents’ manufacturing capabilities!

      “And I’m really not connecting with these characters, I don’t know exactly what it is, but they seem a bit flat and lifeless. ”

      You’re not the only one — and not even the only one on this site! Dawnstorm said something similar.

      I’m going to stay hopeful, but I think I could argue that trying to stay hopeful is itself a comment on the current state!

  3. I’m not sure the theory that he didn’t want them to inspect the weapon makes much sense to me. Isn’t it a little late for that? It’s already packed for shipping. (Maybe they give a routine-inspection before handing it over?) My own pet theory is that he wanted a bargaining chip: Dorothea is neutral and can’t support him, but if they were in his debt somehow? They’d be less likely to get in his way. (He likely knew that something was up.)

    The cars? I laughed. I thought somebody heard “beetle car” and that’s the association. Seriously, what’s the advantage of the hybrid method? Energy efficency? I’d expect the wheels to have quite a bit momentum, if the legs suddenly stop. I’m no mechanic, but I wonder how they balance it? I don’t see the point of the design. Legs give you an advantage in certain terrains, but you sort of squander some of that when half your vehicle relies on wheels. Hm…

    As for Mariya: That shouldn’t be enough to free her from her past, not by a long shot. But it should be enough to settle her current conflict she’s having, just so she can cope as usual. Thinking of yourself as “cursed” is powerful. Bad things happen around anyone, even more so during war and in its aftermath, and then even more if you’re moving in the circles that Mariya does. It’s a very basic outlook, though, for her, to take it upon herself, probably because people have told her she’s cursed. I’m almost sure the cause is connected to how she can be directly possessed (something happened to her as a child?), and I suspect it’s also (less directly) connected to why Ray Dawn burnt down the fairy village.

    One interesting side-point is that the ministry has taken charge of the body. It’s details like this one that have given me confidence that the show knows what it’s doing. I do feel, though, that the character writing is far more conventional and not quite up to the task. It’s competent, and the characters are likable, but I’m not feeling them much beyond their plot function.

    1. “My own pet theory is that he wanted a bargaining chip: Dorothea is neutral and can’t support him, but if they were in his debt somehow? They’d be less likely to get in his way. (He likely knew that something was up.)”

      Can you elaborate a little on that? I’m not seeing how feigning a theft would help him (and keep in mind I was traveling all day, so I might not be thinking as clearly as I could!).

      “Legs give you an advantage in certain terrains, but you sort of squander some of that when half your vehicle relies on wheels.”

      Okay, granted it’s not an M1-A1 main battle tank! Still, I thought they looked creepy. As far as the point of the design, I’m guessing (and yes, it’s a stretch!) that they adapted artificial fairies. Someone had leg manufacturing capability, and they lobbied the fairy division, who needed to curry favor, and so they ended up with the Fair gone version of the Space Launch System.

      “and I suspect it’s also (less directly) connected to why Ray Dawn burnt down the fairy village.”

      That would be interesting, if they could dramatize it properly — to show she’s better able to deal with her self-perception only to learn that she is, in fact, cursed!

      “One interesting side-point is that the ministry has taken charge of the body. It’s details like this one that have given me confidence that the show knows what it’s doing.”

      Gotta admit — you called his early on, and the story-telling is supporting your assertion!

      “I do feel, though, that the character writing is far more conventional and not quite up to the task. It’s competent, and the characters are likable, but I’m not feeling them much beyond their plot function.”

      When I asked myself why I like some of the characters (like Klara, for example), I find that it’s more because of what I insinuate into the character rather than what directly written into them. The potential’s still there, so I’m not going to give up hope!

      1. ************Can you elaborate a little on that? I’m not seeing how feigning a theft would help him (and keep in mind I was traveling all day, so I might not be thinking as clearly as I could!).***********

        Well, it’s hard to explain, and a lot of it (including his actual goals) is actually pretty murky, but I can try.

        So this guy is asking for Fairy Weapon. This is a clear power grab, both in terms of the weapon itself and it’s symbolic value. He says it’s for protecting the King, but that’s obvious diplomatic talk, which nobody believes. He’s not saying this to be believed, and he’ll know he’s going to be scrutinised by both the King and his political opponents. Dorothea aren’t at that level part of the equation yet, since they’re more an executive branch with no overt political goals.

        Now, I imagine he says this knowing that someone’s trying to stir things up. Having the weapon stolen by a former Fairy Knight known to live mostly just for combat? Yeah, people who watch him closely will find it harder to blame him for trying to make a power grab. When the situation escalates, they can’t openly accuse him, even if they still suspect him, because he can just position himself as a poor powerless Lord who had his rightful Fairy Weapon stolen by a mean violent faction. Much like saying he wanted the weapon to protect the King, this is more a diplomatic move than one to convince people.

        And now to Dorothea: they’re neutral and have no overt political goals. But they’re function is to keep the peace, and Nein (a former Fairy Knight with her own Fairy weapn) is working for stability. So while neutral on the political level, Dorothea is an obstacle on the level of the insurrection goal of the faction that’s instigating a war (what his allegience here is is unlcear, might be a double cross, might be playing both sides to come out on top whoever loses, might be one of the ring leaders; I don’t know). So, the King promises a weapon, and Dorothea loses it. Now the King is in a debt of promise to him, and it’s Dorothea’s fault. Under normal circumstances, that would be minor a thing, but in an escalating situation, whatever the King asks from Dorothea as reparations is going to hinder them from getting in his way, because they can’t oppose the King if they want to keep the peace.

        Now depending on the situation, he can intercede with the King on Dorothea’s half, feigning magnimity. That would be a move that helps both King and Dorothea, but it’s also a move that makes it harder for them to move against him.

        It’s a game of diplomacy he’s playing, if I’m right. All the while he still has the weapn (and profits from the symbolic value, too, as the “guy who should have got a fairy weapon”). What I don’t know is what his intentions are: pull the strings from the shadows, or step out into the open and reveal himself at some point? Keeping his options as versatile as possible. I can’t tell.

        1. You description makes sense.

          “It’s a game of diplomacy he’s playing, if I’m right”

          If you’re right, I’ll retract every negative I ever uttered about Fairy gone’s world building! It’d actually be pretty cool…

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