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The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12 Review – Best In Show

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The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12 Review – Quick Summary

In The Detective is Already Dead episode 12, “Those dizzying Three Years I Spent with You,” Kimihiko Kimizuka found himself face to face with Siesta within Nagisa Natsunagi’s body. She even had Siesta’s trademark rifle! But he had no time to enjoy their temporary reunion, because Chameleon’s attacks increased in ferocity until he finally assumed his final form, which was the size of a small Tyrannosaurus Rex. Armed only with a Kimihiko’s pistol (ammunition replenished) and Siesta’s rifle, do our heroes they even have a chance against that charging behemoth?

Note: This post may include spoilers, so be cautious.

Favorite Quote from The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12

The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12: Yui knows the importance of audience development

Well, “worshippers” might be taking it a little far… Capture from the Funimation stream.

The ship’s crew and passengers wanted to throw a party to thank Yui Saikawa for helping save their lives. Yui as a character grew on me thought the series. The idea of an idol at the top of her game, with all of the fame that came with that position, being willing to be a sidekick’s sidekick appealed to me. 

Kinda like a little Batman in training. You know, a rich person with a hidden thing for justice.

Anyway. She had just purchased a new outfit for Kimihiko. Apparently, he had torn up his suit while fighting Chameleon. That’s understandable! I mean, he did jump around alot. As they talked, she noticed it was time for rehearsal. She explained that she wanted to give the passengers and crew a live performance to show her appreciation for their party.

“It’s a great chance for me to gain more worshippers — er, fans,” she said (14:16). 

It’s important for a performer to cultivate new fans!

Best in Show Moment for The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12

The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12: That's seems a little distracting

That would have to be a little distracting! Capture from the Funimation stream.

Setup: But… Why?

During the flashback, why did Siesta have to just walk away from the unconscious Kimihiko? 

Did she really have to entrust his care to someone in the future? 

What happened to Hel? Did she morph into Nagisa? What’s the connection between the two of them?

Hel was an aggressor who wanted to toast the world. Why didn’t Siesta just take over her body and keep it? I guess the answer might be tied to what the relationship is between Hel and Nagisa. Which is to say, someone may know, but I don’t.

What happened to poor Alicia?

The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12: At least Siesta/Nagisa and Kimihiko look stylish together

Their attack made no sense, but at least it looked pleasant enough. Capture from the Funimation stream.

Why did a combined pistol and rifle shot kill Chameleon, when for the entire battle before that time, nothing could touch it (well, except for Nagisa’s high-heeled shoes). Not even Charlotte Arisaka Anderson’s mini-gun. Her anti-materiel rifle seemed to annoy it — maybe Nagisa’s shoes were made of the same material as the anti-materiel bullet?

I can’t imagine that would make a very comfortable shoe.

It was hard to pay attention to the show as those questions rattled around in my brain. I really, really wanted to like this series! Well, the water’s under the bridge and the milk’s all over the floor. Best to just move forward.

Delivery: A Quiet Human Moment — with a Voyeur!

While they fought Chameleon, Siesta said that would be the final time Kimihiko got to talk to her. He accepted that. Apparently, and this actually made sense to me, he felt like getting to talk to her one last time was worth it.

So later, as he sat in the bar with Nagisa, he thought he was talking to Nagisa, and Nagisa alone. He thought that Siesta had relinquished control. Nagisa expressed doubt in her own abilities, and Kimihiko tried to reassure her. He said that even Siesta wasn’t as reliable as she seemed. Saying that she could get caught up in her emotions, he mentioned that “For some reason, we wound up together in bed…”

The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12: Nagisa reached out to Kimihiko

You know, she makes a good point… Capture from the Funimation stream.

Nagisa downed her drink (is she old enough to drink alcohol?), leaned over, and grabbed his chin.

“Ummm, today.. after this,” she said (20:54), “will you come to my room?”

For just a brief instant, Kimihiko caught a clash of the blue of Siesta’s eyes before Nagisa’s eyes went back to normal.

I’m not saying he should jump in bed with Nagisa. All I’m saying is that in that moment, she reached out to him. That was a pleasant, wholly human moment. Though I have to say I’m still wondering what I think of the idea of Siesta sitting inside Nagisa’s mind as she watches what’s going on. That just doesn’t seem at all routine. Might inhibit performance, in fact.

What did you think of the series finale? What were your favorite moments? Let me know in the comments!

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7 thoughts on “The Detective Is Already Dead Episode 12 Review – Best In Show

  1. This episode was about…sex.

    This show is hopeless. That was the worst monster I ever saw. And the sounds it made…I laughed out loud at one point. Yeah, I guess them standing next to each other and shooting at the same moment was the T-Rex Chameleon Godzillia lizard monster’s only weakness. Other than the kick after Nagisa crawled up its tongue. I saw you noticed that too. Ridiculous.

    What was it that he couldn’t tell Nagisa about, or didn’t want Fuubi to tell her about? There’s no way I could figure that out after all the dumbness in this show. I barely could keep names with faces.

    I won’t even get into the resolution of Hel’s body and Seista’s heart and “supressing” Hel’s consciousness and this creating Nagisa or something…I don’t get it. Does this all actually tie together properly or is it all just random bs? Seriously, I wouldn’t say that if I didn’t have that level of intensity of frustration about this.

    One thing that bugged me to the end that I finally realized these last few episodes: the subtitles were terrible. I don’t know much Japanese, but Kimizuka would either say a lot of stuff I couldn’t possibly follow (giving rise to his more detailed English subs) or very ordinary anime phrases. But both his complex gibberish and his ordinary phrases got very complicated English subtitles. Like “yabai” in this episode was subbed as “This is off the rails” and “aho” as “you birdbrain.” I know subs are different depending on the source, and I wasn’t watching this on the official Funimation stream, so was this what you saw as well? And if so…what the hell? Subs usually aren’t direct translations I know, but they seemed particularly ridiculous in this series. It just really dawned on me these last few episodes.

    1. “What was it that he couldn’t tell Nagisa about, or didn’t want Fuubi to tell her about?”

      Among the sheer volume things that I found confusing, I’d forgotten about that! If there weren’t enough clues to figure it out, why include it? If it was un-important enough not to explain, why not leave it out?

      My understanding of Japanese is somewhere between non-existent and extremely limited, so I’m not sure if I saw what you did. One thing I did notice was the translation of “aho.” That stuck out because I’d just seen it in a couple of other series, particularly Girlfriend Girlfriend when Shino said that Saki was an “aho.” They translated it there as “idiot,” if I remember correctly. “Birdbrain” might be a legitimate translation, and maybe it’s idiomatic and depends on the context. Still, “birdbrain” didn’t feel right.

      1. “Aho” is roughly equivalent to American English “idiot” or “dumbass” depending on the context. It’s more intense than the famous “baka” but not wholly a pejorative like “kisama” or “time,” and certainly not “yaro,” which is more of a vulgarity. Like, “aho” could be said to a friend playfully or to anyone just to call them stupid.

        But my point with that is that the “translation” seemed so different in places that it’s almost like there were two different set of dialogues for Japanese and English. Again, I’m not knowledgeable enough to know how generally different Japanese dialogue is from the subs (or dubs, which might actually follow the subs) but it seemed particularly odd in this series.

    1. We only have Kimi’s word that they didn’t. And he’s not know for his reliability!

      Drunk Siesta happily bouncing on the bed is the absolute highlight of the series. If I think about it, I’d have to say that it was worth watching the series just for that moment.

      i can’t tell if that’s a good or a bad thing!

  2. My take on what exactly is Nagisa and Hel’s relationship is how Siesta described it, which is that she would suppress Hel’s evil instincts/consciousness, leading to a unique personality being formed from Hel’s body with Siesta’s heart in it that Siesta named. Assuming this is true, Alicia should still be in there somewhere, although I don’t know what it would take to bring her out.

    What I thought of that moment towards the end is that Siesta decided to influence Nagisa because as Siesta had indicated before, she wouldn’t have minded bedding Kimihiko once in her life.

    1. Regarding Nagisa, I can’t disagree with you. But I still don’t understand the mechanism of physical change. Hel and Nagisa don’t look that much alike, and Alicia looks very different from both. I guess if I accept the premise that those young women have plug-n-play organs, a little body modification isn’t that much of a leap. Still, for a concept that’s at the heart of the series, it received no attention that I could see.

      And Siesta influencing Nagisa: That’s kind of like Siesta giving Nagisa Rohypnol, isn’t it? I mean, that’s not a situation where duress is okay!

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